Common Causes of Pain

Photo
This is a basic list of some of the common causes of pain in the human body. By understanding some of these root causes of pain in your body, you can take the first step towards treating your condition and getting back to a pain-free lifestyle. At Vital Care Rehabilitation, LLC, we have a program that can help you overcome any of the root cause body imbalances listed below.

Low Back Pain

  • Poor Ergonomics
  • Improper Lifting Techniques
  • Weak Abdominal Core
  • Tight Hip Muscles
  • Foot Imbalances
  • Herniated / Bulging Discs
  • Scoliosis
  • Nerve Irritations
  • Poor Postural Alignment of Lumbar Spine
  • Bad Workout Habits at the Gym

Upper Body Pain

  • Forward Head Syndrome
  • Weak Rotator Cuffs
  • Weak Mid Muscles & Shoulder Blades
  • Rounded Shoulders
  • Tight Chest Muscles
  • Neck Arthritis
  • Nerve Impingement
  • Repetitive Motion
  • Forearm Trigger Points
  • Hand Weakness

Lower Body / Foot & Ankle Pain

  • Bad Shoes
  • Decreased Joint Mobility
  • Tight Achilles Tendon
  • Tight IT Band Muscle
  • Heel Spurs
  • Hammer Toes
  • Bunions
  • Patella (Kneecap) Mal-alignment
  • Weak Quads
  • Tight Hamstrings

Balance Disorders

Balance disorders are caused by several different conditions. Disturbances of the inner ear are a common cause. Balance disorders may also be caused by heart problems, head injury, medication, or problems with blood circulation.

Peripheral Neuropathy (Numbness, Tingling, Burning)

Peripheral neuropathy may be either inherited or acquired. Causes of acquired peripheral neuropathy include physical injury (trauma) to a nerve, tumors, toxins, autoimmune responses, nutritional deficiencies, alcoholism, and vascular and metabolic disorders. Acquired peripheral neuropathies are grouped into three broad categories: those caused by systemic disease, those caused by trauma from external agents, and those caused by infections or autoimmune disorders affecting nerve tissue. One example of an acquired peripheral neuropathy is trigeminal neuralgia (also known as tic douloureux), in which damage to the trigeminal nerve (the large nerve of the head and face) causes episodic attacks of excruciating, lightning-like pain on one side of the face. In some cases, the cause is an earlier viral infection, pressure on the nerve from a tumor or swollen blood vessel, or, infrequently, multiple sclerosis. In many cases, however, a specific cause cannot be identified. Doctors usually refer to neuropathies with no known cause as idiopathic neuropathies.